Adam Smith Quotes

Adam Smith

Welcome to Quote Meanings. This page lists the Adam Smith quotes we have in our database and soon will provide users a means to discuss the meanings of quotes listed here. You don't even need to sign up.

Labour was the first price, the original purchase-money that was paid for all things. It was not by gold or by silver, but by labour, that all wealth of the world was originally purchased.

Categorized under Labor

Comments: 0 | Toggle Comments - Add Comment

Science is the great antidote to the poison of enthusiasm and superstition.

Categorized under Science

Comments: 0 | Toggle Comments - Add Comment

It is not from the benevolence of the butcher, the brewer, or the baker, that we expect our dinner, but from their regard to their own self-interest. We address ourselves, not to their humanity but to their self-love, and never talk to them of our own neccessities but of their advantages.

Comments: 0 | Toggle Comments - Add Comment

No society can surely be flourishing and happy, of which the far greater part of the members are poor and miserable.

Comments: 0 | Toggle Comments - Add Comment

A person who can acquire no property, can have no other interest but to eat as much, and to labour as little as possible. Whatever work he does beyond what is sufficient to purchase his own maintenance can be squeezed out of him by violence only, and not by any interest of his own.

Comments: 0 | Toggle Comments - Add Comment

The affluence of the rich excites the indignation of the poor, who are often both driven by want, and prompted by envy, to invade his possessions.

Comments: 0 | Toggle Comments - Add Comment

The man whose whole life is spent in performing a few simple operations, of which the effects are perhaps always the same, or very nearly the same, has no occasion to exert his understanding or to exercise his invention in finding out expedients for removing difficulties which never occur. He naturally loses, therefore, the habit of such exertion, and generally becomes as stupid and ignorant as it is possible for a human creature to become.

Comments: 0 | Toggle Comments - Add Comment

The difference of natural talents in different men is, in reality, much less than we are aware of; and the very different genius which appears to distinguish men of different professions, when grown up to maturity, is not upon many occasions so much the cause as the effect of the division of labour. The difference between the most dissimilar characters, between a philosopher and a common street porter, for example, seems to arise not so much from nature as from habit, custom, and education. When they came into the world, and for the first six or eight years of their existence, they were perhaps very much alike, and neither their parents nor playfellows could perceive any remarkable difference...

Comments: 0 | Toggle Comments - Add Comment

All for ourselves and nothing for other people seems, in every age of the world, to have been the vile maxim of the masters of mankind.

Comments: 0 | Toggle Comments - Add Comment

More Authors Like Adam Smith