Alexander Pope Quotes

Alexander Pope

English poet & satirist (1688 - 1744)

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A bee is not a busier animal than a blockhe

Categorized under Age

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Conceit is to nature what paint is to beauty; it is not only needless, but impairs what it would improve

Categorized under Beauty

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A decent boldness ever meets with friends.

Categorized under Boldness

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Of Manners gentle, of Affections mild; In Wit a man; Simplicity, a child.

Categorized under Character

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But blind to former as to future fate, What mortal knows his pre-existent state?

Categorized under Destiny

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But blind to former as to future fate, What mortal knows his pre-existent state?

Categorized under Fate

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Health consists with temperance alone.

Categorized under Health

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'Tis not enough your counsel still be true; Blunt truths more mischief than nice falsehoods do.

Categorized under Honesty

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But honest instinct comes a volunteer; Sure never to o'er-shoot, but just to hit, While still too wide or short in human wit.

Categorized under Instinct

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Love, free as air at sight of human ties, Spreads his light wings, and in a moment flies.

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Slave to no sect, who takes no private road, But looks through Nature up to Nature's God.

Categorized under Nature

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To observations which ourselves we make, we grow more partial for th' observer's sake.

Categorized under Opinion

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You purchase pain with all that joy can give, and die of nothing but a rage to live.

Categorized under Pain

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It is with narrow-souled people as with narrow-necked bottles: the less they have in them the more noise they make in pouring it out.

Categorized under Tolerance

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In words, as fashions, the same rule will hold; Alike fantastic, if too new, or old: Be not the first by whom the new are tried, Nor yet the last to lay the old aside.

Categorized under Words

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Ten censure wrong, for one that writes amiss.

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Blessed is he who expects nothing, for he shall never be disappointed.

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Be not the first by whom the new are tried,
Nor yet the last to lay the old aside.

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A family is but too often a commonwealth of malignants.

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Amusement is the happiness of those who cannot think.

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Fools admire, but men of sense approve.

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Thus let me live, unseen, unknown; thus unlamented let me die; steal from the world, and not a stone tell where I lie.

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Fools rush in where angels fear to tread.

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There is a certain majesty in simplicity which is far above all the quaintness of wit.

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Envy will merit, as its shade, pursue,
But, like the shadow, proves the substance true.

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Be thou the first true merit to befriend, his praise is lost who stays till all commend.

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A man should never be ashamed to own he has been wrong, which is but saying, that he is wiser today than he was yesterday.

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He who tells a lie is not sensible of how great a task he undertakes; for he must be forced to invent twenty more to maintain that one.

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To err is human, to forgive divine.

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A little learning is a dangerous thing; drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring: there shallow draughts intoxicate the brain, and drinking largely sobers us again.

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To err is human; to forgive, divine.

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Amusement is the happiness of those who cannot think.

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An honest man is the noblest work of God.

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And all who told it added something new, And all who heard it made enlargements too.

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What will a child learn sooner than a song?

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To err is human, to forgive divine.

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Honor and shame from no condition rise.
Act well your part: there all the honor lies.

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Blessed is the man who expects nothing, for he shall never be disappointed.

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Some people will never learn anything, for this reason, because they understand everything too soon.

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One who is too wise an observer of the business of others, like one who is too curious in observing the labor of bees, will often be stung for his curiosity.

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It is with our judgments as with our watches; no two go just alike, yet each believes his own.

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Lulled in the countless chambers of the brain, our thoughts are linked by many a hidden chain; awake but one, and in, what myriads rise!

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The general cry is against ingratitude, but the complaint is misplaced, it should be against vanity; none but direct villains are capable of willful ingratitude; but almost everybody is capable of thinking he hath done more that another deserves, while the other thinks he hath received less than he deserves.

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